Gallery: Edward Burtynsky’s extraordinary images of manufactured landscapes

K:

This is one of reasons why sustainability and giving a care about the environment matters. It’s a big deal.
K

Originally posted on TED Blog:

Edward Burtynsky finds the eerie beauty in the man-made landscapes that dot our Earth’s surface. As a photographer who focuses on the relationship between humans and nature, he travels to the hidden corners of the Earth to document the way people are ravaging our planet. Below, 13 of his haunting images of altered nature. All images shown courtesy of the photographer.

“Densified Oil Filters #1,” Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, 1997.

“Ferrous Bushling #9,” Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, 1997.

“Densified Oil Drums #4,” Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, 1997.

“Nickel Tailings #31,” Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, 1996.

“Nickel Tailings #34,” Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, 1996.

“Rock of Ages #25,” Abandoned Section, Adam-Pirie Quarry, Barre, Vermont, USA, 1991.

“Rock of Ages #26,” Abandoned Section, E.L. Smith Quarry, Barre, Vermont, USA, 1991.

“Iberia Quarries #8,” Cochicho Company, Pardais, Portugal, 2006.

“Silver Lake Operations #1,” Lake Lefroy, Western Australia, 2007.

“Silver Lake Operations #2,” Lake Lefroy, Western Australia, 2007.

“Silver…

View original 24 more words

About these ads

2 thoughts on “Gallery: Edward Burtynsky’s extraordinary images of manufactured landscapes

  1. Since these photos are dated, it would be interesting to see if there has been positive change in any of these areas from the time they were photographed. I would hope that new technologies and the emphasis on environmental awareness and sustainability has had some impact even if it is merely to stop or control the damage done.

    • I would also hope that these areas have been cleaned up since a good 7-17 years have passed, but I know that this issue is still prevalent in other areas today. I recently heard one of the Geography professors speak about mountaintop removal in Kentucky (particularly western KY, I think), and he showed photographs of not only the devastated mountaintops, but also the polluted streams and stagnant bodies of colored water that result from this mining practice. I can’t remember what piece of policy it was, but it required the mining companies to clean up and “restore” the land after they finished working on it, but it unfortunately only applied to areas that they were currently working on and would work on in the future, so past polluted projects were still neglected.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s